Thompson & Morgan
What Wheelbarrow should I buy?

What Wheelbarrow should I buy?

An extremely useful tool in any size garden, a wheelbarrow can save you time and effort when carrying out even the most mundane of job, not to mention it’s a tool that has been designed over the years to make life easier and to save your muscles!

There are three options for barrows available to you, a single wheeled barrow, twin wheeled barrow, or a garden trolley/cart.

What Wheelbarrow should I buy?

Single wheeled barrows are probably the most commonly seen, from building sites to allotments, the simple design is tried and tested and has withstood the test of time. Sizes will vary from less than 85 litres up to a jumbo 165 litre capacity. Be wary of buying a barrow that is too big for your needs, not only will it be very heavy when filled with topsoil for example, it may well be too wide to fit through gates or negotiate tight, narrow pathways. Equally don’t go too small either; it would be pointless buying a barrow that is not going to be able to handle the jobs you have in mind for it. Take the time to check out the various options.

Equally don’t go too small either; it would be pointless buying a barrow that is not going to be able to handle the jobs you have in mind for it. Take the time to check out the various options. If you only need a small barrow then that is fine.

What Wheelbarrow should I buy?
What Wheelbarrow should I buy?

Twin wheeled barrows offer a greater amount of stability, especially when taking heavy loads across uneven ground, where a single wheeled barrow can tip over if unbalanced or not loaded evenly, especially when they are being emptied, a twin wheeled barrow will remain upright. The load is spread across two wheels instead of one as well, meaning it is less likely to sink on boggy ground. Twin wheeled barrows are less manoeuvrable however and need more room to be turned around etc.

Our full range of wheelbarrows is available here Garden Trolleys and Carts are another option for helping in a garden. Less useful on allotments for example, their smaller wheels find it harder to cope over rough ground, however they can prove to be invaluable in large gardens. Mainly designed to be pulled along rather than pushed, trolleys are either constructed with a solid base and sides, or with a heavy duty welded mesh. Trolleys and carts can also sometimes be towed behind a mini garden tractor or lawnmower too, taking almost all the effort out of moving logs or bulky prunings etc.

What Wheelbarrow should I buy?

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Written by: Graham Ward

I’ve been gardening for as long as I can remember, my first earliest memory being planting Graham Ward
seeds in my Grandfather’s prestige flower bed and having a prize lettuce growing there, which he proudly left to show everyone.

Since then, gaining knowledge and experience from both my Grandfather and my Father, I’ve continued to garden, both as a hobby and later on as a professional gardener and landscaper for 12 years. I love all aspects of it, from the design and build, to the planting out of summer borders with plants you’ve either grown from seed or raised from plugs. Unusual varieties always catch my eye and I’m keen to try growing them, even if sometimes it means learning from my mistakes.