Thompson & Morgan
Michael Perry's Gardening Blog

Michael Perry's Gardening Blog


Best of the best, June 2012

Hello,

So, as you know I spend a lot of time in the spring bulb fields against those strong, low-lying Dutch winds, coupled with biting temperatures (especially when I forget my coat!).

But it’s all good, as I always find some gems... and now’s the time to share them with you. Our autumn range is now online and packed to the rafters with bulbs you won’t find anywhere else. Wave goodbye to yet another golden daffodil or scarlet tulip!

Tulip 'English Rose' Collection

Bam! I’ve discovered the best tulips ever, with precious blooms just like English roses. I’ve been searching for years, trekking through many bulb fields to find some as good as these; I wanted to find the fullest, most double ones that open from a rosebud to a voluptuous peony, and that are strong, weather-proof and great for indoor vases too.

Another new collection that took a bit of selecting was the fabulous new Carnation-Flowered Daffodil. What I wanted to do here was select the fullest, most double blooms, just like the very best carnations, but with the sweetest fragrance too, again just like carnations! The collection gives 4 varieties where the blooms last 10-14 days indoors or out. They're good perennial varieties too and will come back year after year.

Carnation-Flowered Daffodil

A few choice bulbs for spring are always fun and good for containers as well as the border. Have a look at the newest types of hyacinths: Yellow Queen, which I selected for its slightly different, more citrus-based fragrance, a bit friendlier than other sickly hyacinths! And what’s new in crocus, I like the trendy striped types - check out crocus cancellatus, a Turkish variety which is autumn-flowering and easy to grow.

And, for a bit of fun why not grow the newest ‘blue lily’. Also known as the ‘Blue Mountain Lily’, Ixiolirion is an unfussy spring-flowering bulb with lavender-blue flowers that are the closest to a blue lily! Impress your friends!

Tulip fields

So... that’s just a few bulbs I have found on my travels, but there are plenty more online and in the catalogues and loads more for the future. If you bear in mind that it takes around 15 years to develop a specific variety of bulb, then you can see that I’ve had to learn to be patient! Follow me on twitter to learn more: gardening_greek

Bye for now,


Michael Perry, New Product Development Manager, Thompson & Morgan